Presentism problem: Half of HR professionals working too much overtime

Presentism problem: Half of HR professionals working too much overtime

Presentism problem: Half of HR professionals working too much overtime

HR has always been a hardworking industry -  so much so that it seems HR leaders are working far and beyond their contracted hours.

A recent report from totaljobs highlighted the industries which work beyond their remit, citing IT and tech workers as the most strung out (56%). This was closely followed by HR at 46% and professional services at 45%.

The research also found that younger workers, aged 18 to 34, believe they’ll be perceived as lazy by their bosses if they leave work on time. And it seems they’re right to worry – as one third of managers claim they look down on employees who leave the office when they’re legally allowed to.

So, what can employers do to ease the presenteeism problem? The report suggests shortening the working day, which has been proven to increase morale and culture. 

In fact, one third of employers (36%) and employees (33%) are united in agreeing that shortening the length of the working day will impact productivity.

“Our research shows that over a third of employers believe that shorter working hours actually improve productivity,” explained Martin Talbot, group marketing director at totaljobs.

“This, alongside the impact that poor work-life balance has upon morale and employee retention explains why many employers are looking to take steps to ensure that their staff go home on-time.”

Presenteeism is most prolific amongst higher earners, with many reporting being anxious about how their colleagues will perceive them if they leave on time.

When asked what they were doing to combat this presenteeism, 26% of employers claim to be taking steps to ensure staff don’t work past their contracted hours, whilst 25% are considering flexible working options.

Do you know the top 10 places to work in Ontario? Find out who made the cut here.

 

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