Woman sacked for shoplifting...40 years ago

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They don’t mess around in the US – it seems a strike against your name will land you on the blacklist for life.

US mortgage firm Wells Fargo gave an employee of five years, Yolanda Quesada, 58, the flick after a background check of all employees revealed Quesada had a shoplifting offence against her name.

A spokesman from the firm told local media that the company had performed background checks due to legal requirements and changes in the regulatory environment. “Because Wells Fargo is an insured depository institution, we are bound by federal law that generally prohibits us from hiring or continuing the employment of any person who we know has a criminal record involving dishonesty or breach of trust,” the spokesman said.

Quesada had shoplifted as a teen shortly after leaving high school in 1972 and has never reoffended. Her role dealt in phone customer service, and did involve handling cash – however, due to the blight on her name, she was told she is ineligible to work at the bank. “I think there are more important things in life than something I did 40 years ago," Quesada said. "I paid for it. I've changed my life.”

While each province is different, in most areas records of minor crimes committed as a teenager would be sealed or destroyed after a  specific length of time and would not show up in a criminal check.

 

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