Best and Worst Jobs of 2012: are you on the list?

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It’s not exactly a nice thought to know that your job has made it on to the ‘worst jobs’ list. So spare a thought for this reporter (who came in at the fifth worst job).

The good news, however, is that on the latest list of more than 200 professions, HR won the bronze medal. Behind Software Engineers and Actuaries, HR is the place to be. That’s according to a survey by, which asked respondents from 200 professions to rate their job based on five criteria: physical demands, work environment, income, stress and hiring outlook.


The Top 10 The bottom 10
1  Software Engineer 191  Broadcaster
2  Actuary 192  Butcher
3  Human Resources Manager 193  Dishwasher
4  Dental Hygienist 194  Meter Reader
5  Financial Planner 195  Waiter/Waitress
6  Audiologist 196  Reporter (Newspaper)
7  Occupational Therapist 197  Oil Rig Worker
8  Online Advertising Manager 198  Enlisted Military Soldier
9  Computer Systems Analyst 199  Dairy Farmer
10  Mathematician 200  Lumberjack

So what makes working in HR so great? Here’s what our HR Stars say is the best thing about being in this industry:

"I often hear that HR professionals deal with the soft side of the business but the soft stuff is sometimes the really hard stuff to impact. I love working on the softer stuff when it’s really taken seriously." - Nancy Nazer, TD

"Being able to use my job as a way to make a positive difference from an engagement and productivity perspective." - Wayne Balshin, Vancouver Coastal Health Authority

"You get to see the outcome of your work through your organizations’ performance in a very real and personal way. I attribute the many invaluable, professional relationships I have made to my line of work." - Jamie Allison, eHealth Ontario

"The sheer diversity of issues and professionals you get to deal with and work with over the course of one’s career." - Neale Harrison, Talent Matters

"It’s the variety, both in people and in functional activities. I was offered a job at Eaton’s as Store Manager of Yorkdale and turned it down as I knew that the breadth and depth in a store manager role couldn’t compare." - Bill Cheshire, Hay Group

"The ability to creatively work within the boundaries set by policy and legislation to develop a system, process or problem resolution that makes sense and is fair to everyone involved." - Kim Killens, South Huron Hospital Association/ Grand Bend Area Community Health Centre

"It touches every aspect of the business and being able to be involved in the shaping of what we do as a business. We’re a people business and the most important aspect of what we do is the people. It’s nice to be able to have that effect." - Michael Bach, KPMG


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