The pitfalls of being an HR consultant

The pitfalls of being an HR consultant

The pitfalls of being an HR consultant Considering transitioning off the corporate ladder and into your own HR consultancy?
 
Those who have forged long and satisfying corporate careers should consider all of the angles before taking the plunge, said Emma Lo Russo, CEO of Digivizer and director of The Business Agency, which works on people, sales and strategy solutions.
 
Lo Russo, whose diverse career includes a stint with Macquarie Bank and three years as COO and President of an international software company, said she thought that by stepping away from her “intense” corporate role, she’d have more flexibility.
 
“I was under some illusion that I would have more time. But when it is truly a start-up with just three or four of you working together, you’re so hands on,” she said.
 
“I’ve had such rich experiences in managing and leading a global company, where my direct reports were the country CEOs, so it was a completely different level of accountability. It’s very different when you go back to doing it all yourself!”
 
For those who are contemplating launching their own business – and also those who are happily working within corporate Canada, but who seek greater challenges – Lo Russo said it’s important to work out specifically where your passion lies.
 
“When I decided to strike out on my own, I realized I kept seeing this persistent thing in my working life: I am happiest when I’m driving enormous change,” she said.
 
“Through my work, I help organizations to drive change through supporting their leaders, whether it’s straight-up coaching of senior leaders, or helping those leaders through a facilitated program of support as they lead change. Seeing such wonderful outcomes for our clients is incredible rewarding.”
6 Comments
  • Sarah Gayer 2014-10-06 11:42:53 AM
    I left the corporate world 14 years ago and love what I am managing my own consulkting business. I went out on my own because I wanted to work 4 days a week and have 3 days off but in reality I work 24/7 in order to support my clients and I am also out networking whenever I can. It is not easy so you really have to think if going out on your own is the best thing for you to do.
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  • Lotte Struwing 2014-10-12 2:37:34 PM
    I started my own HOUR and Career Strategy consulting firm 7.5 years ago. I wanted more time for my kids and wanted to learn at an exponential level. Many 7 week days and long hours but have had the flexibility with my boys which is time I cannot get back and have learned so much about business in a way that working for one employer never would have allowed. This year has been amazing and have really seen all the hard work pay off.
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  • Ruben Benmergui 2014-10-12 7:17:31 PM
    The pitfalls of being an HR Consultant lie in the very fact that this article has been written to point out the pitfalls. Let me explain this from the perspective of a 25-year HR Consultant. What we have here (and is the norm) is advice from someone who 1) Speaks from ad hoc personal experience 2) Is not an HR professional 3) Treats us as innocents (to use a polite word) by stating the obvious.

    I have written here before that the greatest tragedy in pursuing an HR career as I have done for 41 years, is that HRM is an easily invasive field. One can drive truck one day and turn to HR the next day. We are still on the path of full professionalism. I was on the HRPA Board that founded the CHRP and to this day can hear the shrill laughter and derision about creating a professional designation. Not to mention all the cries and resistance from peripheral players in the HR world, from practitioners who did not want the burden of certification, to Personnel Agency personnel who stopped their "professional" development in high school. We as HR professionals are also to blame for this market disarray by not agreeing on standards and educational requisites for the profession (HRPA excepted). So, if you decide to join this market, take these realities into consideration. Those I mention above will be your "HR Consultant" competition on the market. CEOs and COOs ' at this stage don't differentiate between Software Company executives, truck drivers, recruiters, agency marketers, gurus. They have not been educated on HR professionalism.
    Anyone in need of brain surgery? (I feel I'm qualified).

    Ruben Benmergui BA, MIR, LLM, CHRp
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