Increasing pressure on private sector to recruit vets

Increasing pressure on private sector to recruit vets

Increasing pressure on private sector to recruit vets It seems private sector employers may be under increased pressure from the public after a recent study revealed a growing number of Canadians expect those organizations in particular to help military veterans find work.

The study, commissioned by security firm Commissionaires, found that the number of Canadians who believe the private sector has the highest obligation to help veterans find jobs more than doubled from five per cent last year to 12 percent in 2016.

Retired vice-admiral Duncan Miller is the national board chair of Commissionaires – Canada’s largest private sector employer of Canadian veterans – he says that although the figure is still in the minority, it’s encouraging to see growing support.

“I was struck by the significant growth in the number of Canadians who believe the private sector bears some responsibility to help veterans find jobs,” he said.

“It’s no secret that former members of the Canadian Forces bring skills, leadership, and expertise to their new employers,” he continued. “We see that in each veteran we hire.”

Each year, the firm hires more than 1,000 former military and RCMP personnel – it’s a feat which Miller hopes will influence other employers across Canada.

“We’d like to see more private sector players, across all industries, benefit from the veteran advantage,” he said. “It’s a win-win proposition.”

The survey revealed that men are more likely than women to consider the private sector as having the highest obligation to help veterans find jobs after leaving the military – at 15.3 per cent and 7.8 per cent respectively.

Eighty per cent of respondents ranked the federal government as having the highest obligation to ensure veterans find meaningful employment.