Are unambitious workers a problem?

Are unambitious workers a problem?

Are unambitious workers a problem? Not every worker will eventually be CEO, but are employees who are content to remain in their jobs, completing the required tasks but no more, holding a company back? That was the argument from staffing director R. J. Morris, but some Canadian HR pros disagree, saying these workers are often the backbone of an organization.
 
" ‘Competent squatter’ – what a nasty and contemptuous phrase for the majority of employees who are content at what they do, pleasant, competent, reliable and good team players,” Ann wrote. “Not every employee needs to be ambitious.”
 
She added that if an employee was disinterested or not performing then HR should address the problem, but they also needed to recognize the importance of having “good solid and reliable performers who may not have the potential or desire to perform up.”
 
However, some HR leaders suggested these workers could be less adaptable and effective in the long term.
 
“I think that the fear for organizations in the ‘competent squatter’ is that while they are good at the job they currently hold, their adaptability to change as the technology, and business changes may be limited,” Zakeana wrote. “A company of such workers would quickly fall behind one that values learning, growth, change and innovation - in my opinion.”
 
 
 
8 Comments
  • Lisetta Chalupiak 2014-06-14 9:44:56 PM
    This article is deeply disturbing to me. Life happens and sometime people are not free to pursue the next step up. Widowed with five young children, I have had to balance work and home....passionate about my job and my kids, and have grown and contributed more than my peers at work..this article dismisses and devalues the work of people who are content, or have had to accpet being in their level
    Post a reply
  • Jaen Watson 2014-06-16 9:45:46 AM
    My thoughts on the concept of 'the competent squatter': http://talentvanguard.com/2014/06/12/everyone-must-be-exceptional/
    Post a reply
  • Sonnya 2014-06-16 10:04:00 AM
    The problem I have with this article and the previous one on "competent squatters, is the lack of evidence or references to support offhanded comments that are basically the equivalent of watercooler chats. These articles simply cannot stand scrutiny. Do make an effort to be a bit more credible.
    Post a reply